impassioned

impassioned, passionate, ardent, fervent, fervid, perfervid mean actuated by or showing intense feeling.
Impassioned, though applicable to persons, is more often found in reference to utterance or artistic expression or to the mood or mental state which evokes such utterance or expression. The word usually implies intensity without violence and feeling of such depth, sincerity, and potency that it passes naturally and inevitably from the person into his expression
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poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge; it is the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all science— Wordsworth

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the letters... are written by this master of impassioned recollection in a style so musical, so magical and moving, that the experiences he recounts become our own— L. P. Smith

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as his impassioned language did its work the multitude rose into fury— Froude

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Passionate, on the other hand, implies vehemence and, often, violence of emotion; when the latter idea is suggested, the word also may connote loss of rational guidance or wasteful diffusion or misdirection of emotional power
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a passionate denunciation

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a passionate reformer

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passionate partisanship

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passionate feeling is desirable, provided it is not destructive— Russell

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to match mere good, sound reasons, against the passionate conclusions of love is a waste of intellect bordering on the absurd— Conrad

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the passionate and uncompromisingly ruthless war spirit, common to Communists and Fascists— Cohen

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Ardent differs from passionate largely in its freedom from derogatory implications and in its connotations of qualities suggestive of flame or fire. It is especially appropriate when vehemence is implied and the intense feeling expresses itself in eagerness, zeal, enthusiasm, or acts of devotion
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an ardent desire for the truth

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an ardent supporter of liberal ideas

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an ardent lover

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heredity in man is hardly the simple thing that many of the ardent eugenists would have us believe— Furnas

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gave constant proofs of his ardent longing for an education— Merriman

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Fervent also implies a quality of fire, but it suggests a fire that glows rather than one that bursts into flame. Hence, though it implies strength and depth of feeling, it more often suggests steadiness than vehemence and inward quiet rather than outward activity. It is applicable especially to wishes, prayers, or hopes that are heartfelt or devout, but it is also applied to an emotion, or to a person feeling such an emotion, that is free from turbulence
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fervent thanks

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fervent good wishes

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a fervent Christian

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fervent prayers

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Jane's feelings, though fervent, were little displayed— Austen

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the gods approve the depth, and not the tumult, of the soul; a fervent, not ungovernable, love— Wordsworth

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Fervid, like impassioned; is applied more to moods and expressions than to persons; in contrast to impassioned, however, it sometimes suggests more obvious, more warmly expressed, and, often, more spontaneous emotion
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who could help liking her? her generous nature, her gift for appreciation, her wholehearted, fervid enthusiasm?— L. P. Smith

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Frequently it carries a strong suggestion of feverishness which distinguishes it sharply from fervent; thus, fervent thanks suggest the depth and sincerity of the emotion which prompts them; fervid thanks suggest profuseness or an overwrought state of mind
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his fervid manner of love-making offended her— Bennett

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Perfervid carries an implication of too great emotional excitement or of overwrought feelings; more than fervid, it casts doubt upon the sincerity of the emotion that is displayed with vehemence
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to court their own discomfiture by love is a common instinct with certain perfervid women— Hardy

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in his perfervid flag-waving moments— S. H. Adams

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Analogous words: vehement, *intense, fierce, violent: *deep, profound: *sentimental, romantic, maudlin
Antonyms: unimpassioned
Contrasted words: dispassionate, uncolored, objective (see FAIR adj)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Impassioned — Im*pas sioned, p. p. & a. Actuated or characterized by passion or zeal; showing warmth of feeling; ardent; animated; excited; as, an impassioned orator or discourse. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • impassioned — index eager, earnest, eloquent, fanatical, fervent, intense, perfervid, vehement, zealous …   Law dictionary

  • impassioned — (adj.) c.1600, pp. adjective from IMPASSION (Cf. impassion) …   Etymology dictionary

  • impassioned — [adj] excited, vehement animated, ardent, blazing, burning, deep, fervent, fervid, fierce, fiery, fired up*, flaming, furious, glowing, heated*, hot blooded*, inflamed, inspired, intense, melodramatic, moving, mushy, overemotional, passionate,… …   New thesaurus

  • impassioned — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ filled with or showing great emotion …   English terms dictionary

  • impassioned — [im pash′ənd] adj. filled with passion; having or showing strong feeling; passionate; fiery; ardent SYN. PASSIONATE impassionedly adv …   English World dictionary

  • impassioned — adjective Date: 1603 filled with passion or zeal ; showing great warmth or intensity of feeling Synonyms: impassioned, passionate, ardent, fervent, fervid, perfervid mean showing intense feeling. impassioned implies warmth and intensity without… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • impassioned — im|pas|sioned [ımˈpæʃənd] adj full of strong feeling and emotion ▪ She appeared on television to make an impassioned plea for help. ▪ an impassioned speech …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • impassioned — [[t]ɪmpæ̱ʃ(ə)nd[/t]] ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n An impassioned speech or piece of writing is one in which someone expresses their strong feelings about an issue in a forceful way. [JOURNALISM or, WRITTEN] He made an impassioned appeal for peace. Syn:… …   English dictionary

  • impassioned — adjective an impassioned speech, request, argument etc is full of strong feeling and emotion: She appeared on television to make an impassioned appeal to the kidnappers …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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